Posted in Pets

Indoor Pet Safety Checklist

Make your home safe and sound for your petsBy Amy Laughinghouse

Pampered house pets are the lottery winners of the animal kingdom. Protected from the drooling jaws of predators, an indoor pet’s most difficult decision is deciding whether to sleep in the sunbeam by the stove or by the fireplace.
In fact, while an outdoor cat has an average life span of only three years, an indoor cat’s average life span is 12 years or more (in comparison, a dog’s lifespan varies among breeds but the median longevity age ranges from 10 to 13 years). But unexpected dangers, often posed by objects as mundane as dental floss and dishrags, do lurk within.
Here’s a look at some steps you can take to help make your home the safe haven your pets deserve.
  • When choosing treats, bear in mind that balls, bones, rawhide chews (which may also contain salmonella), rubber bands and toys with small parts all pose choking hazards. A ball that is large in relation to your pet’s mouth will not be as easily to swallow.
  • Supervise pets when they are playing with string, dental floss, yarn or curtain cords, which can wrap around their neck or be ingested.
  • Keep dishrags, which may be saturated with tasty smells or food particles, someplace inaccessible to pets. If digested, they could cause intestinal blockage.
    Store all medicines safely away from pets.
  • Be aware that many common household items—including batteries, cleaners, detergents, fabric softener sheets, and insecticides—can be poisonous to animals.
  • If you have fish, avoid burning incense or spraying insecticides, which can leave a deadly film on the surface of a fish tank.
  • Keep your toilet seat down to prevent your pet from drinking out of it and ingesting cleaning chemicals.
  • Avoid using pump or aerosol sprays around birds. The fumes from self-cleaning ovens and nonstick cooking surfaces can also be lethal to birds.
  • Discard wood shavings. Some, such as cedar and pine, emit fumes that are toxic to small animals like hamsters and gerbils.
  • Never use dog-specific products (including flea treatments) on cats, as these may contain ingredients poisonous to felines.
  • Place a tight lid on your trashcan, as pets may knock it over and consume dangerous discards.
  • Refrain from feeding your pets people food. Visit the Humane Society of the United States website for a list of foods toxic to animals.
  • Before you choose your houseplants, visit HSUS for a list of common poisonous plants. Also note that pine needles are so toxic to cats that even drinking from the base of the Christmas tree could cause illness.
  • Do not allow animals to chew on electrical cords, including Christmas tree light cords.
  • Keep animals away from Christmas tinsel, which can become lodged in their digestive system.
  • Avoid glass ornaments or ornaments with small parts that can break off and be swallowed.
  • Be sure that curious animals do not become trapped in large appliances, such as a refrigerator, dishwasher, clothes washer or dryer, while exploring or looking for a cozy place to nap.
  • Post a firefighter’s alert pet decal on your windows and doors to let rescuers know that pets are inside.
  • Keep a copy of the Pet First Aid book and a Pet First Aid Kit on hand in the event of injury. You can find both the book and kit the Humane Society’s online pet shop.  HSUS also has a list of what you should keep in a first-aid kit for your pet.

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Thank you for being here. I'm a Real estate agent with Keller Williams Signature.I hope that you can visit my website www.jeanethjimenez.com whether you are looking for homes for Sale or buy or just as a source for real estate information.

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